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Nutrition Notes

Nutrition notes: Don’t base your diet on these nutrition myths

Nutrition notes: Don’t base your diet on these nutrition myths

Elaine Hastings, Nutritionist, Fitness & Healthy Lifestyles Expert

Separate food fact from fiction

We’ve all heard certain “facts” about nutrition so many times that we take them at face value, no longer questioning their validity. I’m going to knock a hole in a few of the things we “know” to be true about food.

Let’s start with the food that’s hardest to avoid: sugar. Those who’ve ever attempted the Atkins Diet or simply tried to avoid sugar probably got a rude
awakening when they started reading labels. Sugar is hiding everywhere: lunch meat, ketchup, salad dressings. The average person in the U.S. consumes about “128 pounds” a year, or 34 teaspoons a day.

Super-size fountain drink, anyone?

But what about sugar causing hyperactivity in kids? Controlled studies prove that’s false. And doesn’t eating sugar put a person at risk for diabetes? No.

What causes diabetes is lack of inactivity, being overweight and a high-calorie diet. Diabetes patients have to cut way down on sugar, but just don’t go there.

Perhaps you’ve heard that brown sugar is healthier than white sugar. Sorry to disappoint, but brown sugar is white granulated sugar with molasses added. The mineral content between the two is insignificant at the end of the day.

Sugar is a refined food that’s been stripped of fiber, water, vitamins and minerals. Avoid foods that list a variant of it as its first three ingredients. This
includes dextrose, lactose, sucrose and maltose. Sugar is calories without nutrients, so picture that 128-pound pile and try to make a dent in it. The “brown vs. white” myth has carried over into the egg department as well. While they may look more natural, brown eggs have no additional nutritional benefits over white. Nor are they higher quality or more flavorful. Hen color determines the eggshell color. White feather hens lay white eggs; red feather
hens lay brown eggs.

While we’re on the subject of protein, I’ll dispel a few other myths. Low-carb diets will cause temporary weight loss but are not a good long-term idea. You may end up ingesting too much cholesterol, which ups the risk of heart disease. Too few fruits and whole grains can lead to a lack of fiber and constipation. Too few carbs can also make a person feel tired, weak or nauseous. Being wobbly at a party can really detract from a girl’s beautiful size 6 cocktail dress.

Another risk of too few carbs is the buildup of ketones in your blood. The kickoff of the Atkins diet is designed to put your body “in ketosis” … but over
time, these ketones cause the body to produce a lot of uric acid, a risk factor for joint swelling (gout) and kidney stones. You’ll also notice your new bad
breath, and your friends may too.

Ketosis makes the body use fat instead of carbs as an energy source. The weight you lose may well be lean muscle and water. So much better to reduce
calories, fat and exercise.

Final myth: cabbage soup and grapefruit burn fat. Nope, sorry, reread the last few paragraphs. You’ll just lose water weight, lean muscle and feel tired
and queasy. And that’s the truth!

#elainehastings

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About Elaine Sirt -Hastings, RD. National Nutrition, Energy & Human Performance Expert

Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist Elaine Sirt-Hastings, RD, LD/N, CSSD is the Founder of Associates in Nutrition and Sports Specialty and President of. Elaine Hastings and Associates, a National Expert in Nutrition, energy, supplements and human performance, a leader in the health, wellness, fitness and sports nutrition industries. Elaine is an engaging and informed Supplement, Performance and Energy Expert. Elaine is a go-to media source both nationally and internationally, with extensive knowledge in every aspect of nutrition. She has been a multimedia content contribute and media resource for some 20 years. Elaine specializes in human performance, wellness, energy, nutrition, fitness, eating disorders, sports and team nutrition. She is a highly sought after educator, author and spokesperson with excellent cross-cultural awareness. Being a former athlete and model Elaine knows how to help you Stay in Your Game! Stay in Your Game™ Eat and move for Top Performance in YOUR Life! …work. fitness. corporate. teams. athletes. kids.

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  1. Pingback: Nutrition notes: Don't base your diet on these nutrition myths … | Fresh Green World - May 28, 2012

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